Honor 30 lite Goes Official; Dimensity 800, 90Hz Screen, and a 48MP Triple Camera on a Budget

Faisal Rasool

Adding to its ever-expanding portfolio of budget-minded 5G phones, Honor has taken wraps off the much-awaited (and leaked) Honor 30 Lite. In the first phase of the rollout, the Chinese OEM has introduced the sub-flagship for its domestic market before it makes out to the rest of the world. Packing a modern chipset, a beautiful display, and 5G, the Honor 30 Lite is built to give you the bang for your buck.


You’re looking at a 6.5” LCD panel, that features slim bezels on the new 30 Lite, a notch, and a smooth 90Hz refresh rate. Carrying a Pocket-friendly Huawei Mobile price tag, the screen produces an FHD+ resolution and reaches 91.2% in screen-to-body ratio. The notch has a dew-drop design and houses the phone’s 16MP front-facing camera.


Go around the back of the Honor 30 lite to find a polished exterior shell and a deep black, lengthened camera bump that resides in its corner.

It’s painted in four gorgeous gradients: the muted and elegant Magic Midnight Black, and the more vivid Phantom Silver, Summer Rainbow, and Wizard of Oz — these three have a sunburst pattern emerging from a corner, that stretches and blends into the glass sandwich body. The side-facing power button doubles as a capacitive thumbprint reader.


The rear camera on the Honor 30 lite is your cookie-cutter midrange configuration. It uses a 48MP main camera with a wide f/1.8 aperture, an 8MP ultra-wide module, and a 2MP camera for depth sensing. You can shoot in 4K, stabilized by EIS and toggle on the ‘Super Night Mode’ in low-light.

MediaTek’s Dimensity 800 platform powers the phone, in combination with 6GB + 64GB and 8GB + 128GB of memory and storage. The processor has eight cores, clocked at 2.0GHz and a Mali-G57 MC4 GPU for handling graphics. Honor has hooked this flagship internals to a 4,000 mAh battery that can be powered up with 22.5W fast charging. The Honor 30 Lite starts from CNY 1,700 (~40,000 PKR, without taxes) but we have no word of when (or if) it’ll land in Pakistan.